Details, details, details

white/black/red tartan shirtdress, front view, with white boots and white hosiery

Often, it’s the the small details that separate a “home made” garment from the “Wow, you made that?!” garment. I would like to share a few details from my recent use of Dress Shop and from making a shirtdress recently.

Dress Shop generates the pattern pieces for the collar such that the undercollar is slightly shorter and narrower than the collar. The collar is then eased into the undercollar, generating tension that will curve the collar inward without needing a lot of steaming:
pattern pieces for undercollar vs collar

Also, the undercollar is cut on the bias, which gives it a bit of elasticity and makes it much easier to ease the collar into it:
collar & undercollar comparison

Another “detail” I would like to mention is buttonhole orientation. On my white black red tartan flannel shirtdress, all buttonholes are oriented vertically, as in most shirts and dresses, except for one. I oriented one buttonhole horizontally, the one near the waistline. It’s a touch I noticed in Italian tailored men’s shirts. The one horizontal buttonhole ensures that the two overlapping layers don’t shift vertically relative to each other:
close-up showing horizontal buttonhole
This is especially important for plaids, tartans, and patterns or where alignment is important, such as alignment of horizontal details (seams, piping, pleats, etc.).

Here’s another wearing of the dress, this time after getting my bangs chopped. Hosiery: Wolford Satin Touch 20; boots: Loriblu.
white/black/red tartan shirtdress, front view, with white boots and white hosiery