“Dress Shop” motorcycle jacket

front view of motorcycle jacket, orange polyester fleece front view of motorcycle jacket, orange polyester fleece, showing lining both sides
I am continuing to explore using Dress Shop Pro to make my own patterns. My initial attempts at a few pairs of shorts were moderately successful. For best result, I should really have spent the time and effort to make a sloper and adjust my measurements set in Dress Shop. If you’re like me though, you’d lack the patience to undertake that step. I decided that I’d make “wearable prototypes” instead and adjust my measurements set with each succeeding one. That way, my time and effort would result in things I can wear and yet also contribute to refining my measurements set.

For example, after the last thing that I made, a halter top sheath dress, I changed some measurements before making this biker jacket: reduced the “across back” measurement by 1/2″ and decreased the “bust back” measurement by 1/2″.

I intended this jacket to be only a “wearable prototype” to further refine my measurements set in Dress Shop. However, I got carried away with the trims a little bit! 🙂 I had some black and white harlequin pattern cotton left over from when I made my Carnaval Austin costume earlier this year, so I used that for trim: undercollar, front facings, welts and bags for hand warmer pockets, wrist straps, and epaulets:
3/4 front view of motorcycle jacket, orange polyester fleece front view of motorcycle jacket, orange polyester fleece, showing left side lining
hand warmer pocket, topstitched hand warmer pocket, topstitched & opened
wrist straps and would-be epaulets

Did I say epaulets? I meant “would-be epaulets”, of course. 🙂 I was going to add epaulets but when I inserted the sleeves, I completely forgot to insert the epaulets. So now I had two left-over epaulets. What to do? Since I had put some effort in making them, making sure the pattern lined up and was the same on both epaulets, I didn’t want to waste them. I used them as “back straps” at the jacket’s back side waist. Doing that allowed me to add a bit of gather to that location, to improve the cut and fit a little:
3/4 back right view of motorcycle jacket, orange polyester fleece

I also had some tan bottomweight cotton twill laying around on my cutting table, so I used it for the inside pocket’s welts:
inside double welted pocket & facing & lining inside double welted pocket

For buttons, I had a bunch of multicolor buttons of assorted sizes that I bought as part of a big bag at Jo-Ann, so I used the brown buttons. I wanted to use the sage green buttons but I don’t have enough of them in the set.
BIG button!

I also topstitched with black topstitching thread, mainly to anchor the seam allowances, because the fuzzy fleece obscures the topstitching quite a bit so it is not as decorative as topstitching would normally be:
topstitched seams

I used an ivory cotton voile for the lining, with the thinking that it’d be light and not add much bulk. Plus, it’s much smoother than the fleece which makes donning and doffing the jacket easier. The fleece can be quite fuzzy and thus “grabby”. The cotton voile is a bit too sheer, however, so it doesn’t actually hide the jacket’s inside very well, like a lining should. It’d have been more suitable as lining for a garment that one doesn’t take off in public, say, a skirt. (Well, at least *I* don’t take my skirt off in public. 🙂 )

front left view of motorcycle jacket, orange polyester fleece front right view of motorcycle jacket, orange polyester fleece side view of motorcycle jacket, orange polyester fleece